Pacific Tree Frog

Pseudacris regilla
Pacific tree frog
About The Pacific Tree Frog
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Amphibia
  • Order: Anura
Fun Facts:
  • Pacific Tree Frogs are social and often frequently heard in chorus.
  • Interestingly, males will not let normal disturbances such as shaking or other sounds interrupt their songs, but they will temporarily stop if an intruder enters their territory.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

These small frogs can be 2-3 inches in length with females being larger than males. They sport large toe pads and can vary in color from brown to green as they are believed to be able to change color to match their surroundings and possible, as a reaction to high temperature, whereupon they turn yellow. Individuals can also be distinguished by a variety of dark markings that line their bodies, while their undersides usually sport lines of broken spots. Females can be identified by their white throats, while males have throats that are yellow or dark brown, with wrinkles.

DISTRIBUTION

The Pacific Tree Frog is found on the western coasts of Canada, Mexico, and the United States. This adaptable amphibian is at home in a variety of habitats, including forests, grassland, woodland, chaparral, and farmland. In these areas, it is most often found in low vegetation near water.

BEHAVIOR

Pacific Tree Frogs are social and often frequently heard in chorus. Interestingly, males will not let normal disturbances such as shaking or other sounds interrupt their songs, but they will temporarily stop if an intruder enters their territory. During breeding season, males will become territorial and fight to defend their areas, if necessary.

REPRODUCTION & GROWTH

Pacific Tree Frogs breed from January to mid-May and the 5-70 eggs are deposited among rooted plants in gently moving water.

NOTES ON CONSERVATION

The IUCN Red List considered the Pacific Tree Frog to be a species of Least Concern, owing to their broad range and wide adaptability.

HONOLULU ZOO

Our Pacific chorus frog was found in a shipment of Christmas trees and was subsequently turned over to the zoo to help educate our visitors about how invasive species arrive in Hawaii and the damage they could do if allowed to become established.

CITATIONS

Pseudacris regilla . (n.d.). Retrieved January 11, 2017, from http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/55897/0

Mullins, M. F. (n.d.). Pseudacris regilla (Northern Pacific Treefrog). Retrieved January 11, 2017, from http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Pseudacris_regilla/

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